family, motherhood

Santa is Bringing My Daughter 1 Toy for Christmas… And I’m Not Sorry

santa 2019 (3)

My family has excess. I don’t mean that in a we-have-a-ton-of-money way (because we don’t) or a we-take-elaborate-vacations-and-own-a-vacation-home-in-Tahiti way (uh, because dream on).

What I mean is that our needs are met, as are many of our wants. We have more food than we need, more clothes than we need, and our only child certainly has more toys than any one child needs. We simply have excess in our home.

Our 2-year-old daughter is mostly sweet, charming, and a delight to be around. While she has her toddler temper moments as all little ones do, she fills our lives with joy and fun daily. I am 100% certain her name is on Santa’s “Nice” list. And yet, I heard from Santa’s head elf (her name is Mama) that she is getting exactly one toy for Christmas.

Santa won’t be a total Grinch to our daughter. There will be a few other presents to unwrap. I heard she’s getting a bath towel and plate, bowl, and cup set (practical things that she needed anyway) and a sticker activity book to keep in the diaper bag while we’re on the go. But as for shiny, new toys to add to her collection? There won’t be a pile for her waiting under the tree; there will be one. And I’m not sorry.

Why is a Good Girl Getting Just 1 Toy for Christmas?

I, oops, I mean Santa made this decision after her second birthday. We didn’t have a big party this year – just little family gatherings on each side of the family with cake and snacks. And a massive pile of gifts. It was during the first of these family parties that she learned the word “present,” then quickly learned to string the phrase, “more presents.” After tearing open each gift, she would ask for “more presents.” And I knew that something needed to change.

That is why Santa is only bringing my child one toy for Christmas.

I want to teach my daughter to be grateful for what she has. I understand this is ambitious at the age of 2. But heck, this is a lesson that I am still trying to drill into my own head. So maybe if we start early enough, it will stick. We have more than we need. Let’s give thanks for the blessings we have, not ask for more. 

Enough is Enough: We Don’t Need More

Does my daughter need dress-up clothes for every Disney princess? No. Do I need to make a trip to Target for shampoo and walk out $50 (okay $75) poorer but with super cute clothes? Also no.

Our culture tells us that we deserve to have the things we want. Ads come at us from all sides for the newest, tripped out cars, the latest tech gadgets, the most refreshing sodas, you name it. If it’s for sale, marketers want to persuade you to buy it (I’m in marketing – this is a fact). And heck, we work hard to earn money – shouldn’t we get to spend it in ways that make us happy?

I would like to say yes. Go for it. Buy all the things you want (and can afford) if that is what makes you happy. But I know it won’t. Not really. You may have been groomed to THINK that your life will be made complete with a cell phone that can film in super slow mo (looking at you, new iPhone), but it won’t. There will always be something new, something better. You will never be satisfied is you try to find contentment by acquiring physical things.

Modeling Gratitude

Gratitude is a tricky business but I want to model it for my daughter because she is watching me. What I want her to see when she looks at me is a mother who is content because of the people in her life and a relationship with a the One who saved her life, not the stuff in it. This is something that I want my daughter to see throughout the year, not just in the Christmas season. And the way that she will learn it is if I truly live it.

To the family who may be reading this, I want you to know that we deeply appreciate the thoughtful gifts you’ve given our daughter. Thanks to you, she has a playroom full of toys that provide hours of entertainment and fun. But this year, I would ask that you slow down the flow of new things before we overflow.  Instead, come hang out with us for a day. Gift our daughter your presence, not your presents. Show her you love her with your time. It may not be store-bought (or elf-made), but it is surely more meaningful.

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